Human-Computer Interaction 3e Dix, Finlay, Abowd, Beale

exercises  -  3. the interaction

EXERCISE 3.8

The typical computer screen has a WIMP setup (what does WIMP stand for?) Most common WIMP arrangements work on the basis of a desktop metaphor , in which common actions are likened to similar actions in the real world. For example, moving a file is achieved by selecting it and dragging it into a relevant folder or filing cabinet. The advantage of using a metaphor is that the user can identify with the environment presented on the screen. Having a metaphor allows them to predict the outcome of their actions more easily.

Note that the metaphor can break down, however. What is the real-world equivalent of formatting a disk? Is there a direct analogy for the concept of 'undo'? Think of some more examples yourself.

answer

open-ended


Other exercises in this chapter

ex.3.1 (ans), ex.3.2 (ans), ex.3.3 (ans), ex.3.4 (open), ex.3.5 (open), ex.3.6 (tut), ex.3.7 (tut), ex.3.8 (open), ex.3.9 (tut), ex.3.10 (open), ex.3.11 (tut), ex.3.12 (tut)

all exercises for this chapter


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