Human-Computer Interaction 3e Dix, Finlay, Abowd, Beale

CHAPTER 10
universal design

 outline 

 links 

 resources 

 exercises 

EXERCISE 10.1

Is multi-modality always a good thing? Justify your answer.

answer available for tutors only

 

EXERCISE 10.2

What are (i) auditory icons and (ii) earcons? How can they be used to benefit both visually-impaired and sighted users?

answer available for tutors only

 

EXERCISE 10.3

Research your country's legislation relating to accessibility of technology for the disabled. What are the implications of this to your future career in computing?

answer available for tutors only

 

EXERCISE 10.4

Take your university web site or another site of your choice and assess it for accessibility using [WEBAIM*]. How would you recommend improving the site?
* Note that the question in the book mentions Bobby, but the Bobby site is not longer online, use WEBAIM or AChecker instead.

answer available for tutors only

 

EXERCISE 10.5

How could systems be made more accessible to older users?

answer available for tutors only

 

EXERCISE 10.6

Interview either (i) a person you know over 65 or (ii) a child you know under 16 about their experience, attitude and expectations of computers. What factors would you take into account if you were designing a website aimed at this person?

answer available for tutors only

 

EXERCISE 10.7

Use the Screen Reader simulation available at http://www.webaim.org/simulations/screenreader to experience something of what it is like to access the web using a screen reader. Can you find the answers to the test questions on the site?

answer available for tutors only

  

Think of a set of naturally occurring sounds to represent the operations in a standard drawing package (for example, draw, move, copy, delete, rotate). [page 378]

  
  • a worked exercise
  
  • a worked exercise
  
  • a worked exercise

home | about | chapters | resources | exercises | online | editions | interactive | community | search | plus +++
chapters: introduction | 1. human | 2. computer | 3. interaction | 4. paradigms | 5. design basics | 6. software process | 7. design rules | 8. implementation | 9. evaluation | 10. universal design | 11. user support | 12. cognitive models | 13. socio-organizational | 14. comm and collab | 15. task models | 16. dialogue | 17. system models | 18. rich interaction | 19. groupware | 20. ubicomp, VR, vis | 21. hypertext and WWW | references